arimage:

Deep brain stimulation (DBS) is one of the most invasive focal neuromodulation techniques available. It is being investigated for several psychiatric disorders, most notably treatment-resistant depression and treatment-refractory obsessive-compulsive disorder, but also Tourette’s Syndrome, Alzheimer’s dementia, and addiction. The rationale for using DBS in the treatment of psychiatric disorders is based on its effectiveness in several movement disorders and the development of detailed neuroanatomical models for regulating emotion, cognition, and behavior. Above, you can see a diagram* of a deep brain stimulation system. Electrodes are implanted via stereotactic neurosurgery and attached to an implanted pulse generator via subcutaneous extension wires. 
Find out more in the article Deep Brain Stimulation for Psychiatric Disorders, written by Paul E. Holtzheimer and Helen S. Mayberg, of the Emory University School of Medicine for the 2011 Annual Review of Neuroscience.
*Image courtesy of David Peace, of the University of Florida School of Medicine.

arimage:

Deep brain stimulation (DBS) is one of the most invasive focal neuromodulation techniques available. It is being investigated for several psychiatric disorders, most notably treatment-resistant depression and treatment-refractory obsessive-compulsive disorder, but also Tourette’s Syndrome, Alzheimer’s dementia, and addiction. The rationale for using DBS in the treatment of psychiatric disorders is based on its effectiveness in several movement disorders and the development of detailed neuroanatomical models for regulating emotion, cognition, and behavior. Above, you can see a diagram* of a deep brain stimulation system. Electrodes are implanted via stereotactic neurosurgery and attached to an implanted pulse generator via subcutaneous extension wires.

Find out more in the article Deep Brain Stimulation for Psychiatric Disorders, written by Paul E. Holtzheimer and Helen S. Mayberg, of the Emory University School of Medicine for the 2011 Annual Review of Neuroscience.

*Image courtesy of David Peace, of the University of Florida School of Medicine.

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ann-walker:

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ann-walker:

I always need this on my blog

piedoomy:

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pleatedjeans:

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